Today: Jun 17, 2024

Monthly Magic hosts evil eye event

“The evil eye is a worldwide phenomenon and belief in this idea that someone can look at you, and just by looking at you, they can give you an evil gaze,” said Coordinator of Monthly Magic Kyle Magri. 

This is a belief held by many different types of religion and spirituality. The meeting explained its role in religions such as Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism and Paganism. 

“Every culture and religion has some experience with the evil liar, some belief, or at least a rejection of the notion of the evil eye,” Magri said.  

Monthly Magic meetings have an interfaith focus to their topics. Every month, Magri prepares a presentation on a topic of his choosing. This can either be about a belief held by multiple religions or a specific belief in a certain religion.  

Some Monthly Magic attendees are people who want an educational experience on spirituality and culture. Both believers and nonbelievers participate in the monthly meetings.  

“I have some Pagan friends who’ve talked about that, and I’m excited to learn what it actually is,” said earth science major Alexander Moser, a sophomore.  

There are some students who actively practice the beliefs of the evil eye. This includes different charms worn on jewelry meant to protect them from the evil eye.  

“It’s more of a comfort thing to just know that you’re being protected from people who are trying to harm you,” said environmental science major Abby Boyle, a junior.  

The evil eye is a darker topic that Monthly Magic has decided to present to students. Magri says he typically tries to pick out topics that are uplifting to students. However, a twist for Halloween felt appropriate.  

“Since it’s October, I wanted to do a topic that’s got a little bit of an edge to it and is a little scary, and the evil eye, this idea that someone can just on a look, give you bad luck or curse,” Magri said.  

Monthly Magic is affiliated with the SAGE Center, making a queer lens important to their meetings. The evil eye was the perfect way to blend both spooky topics and queer spirituality.  

“A lot of women and queer people are believed to have special power to give people the evil eye, send evil their way and to provide the means for people to protect from the evil eye,” Magri said.  

The queer history was an important aspect to this meeting. Queer students have an ability to feel more connected to the roots of spirituality after historically being left out of those conversations.  

“We’re here to create a safe space for queer people to engage with spirituality and religion. That’s always been our mission,” Magri said.  

All students can find something to learn from the evil eye, whether it’s new information on queerness, spirituality or culture.  

“There’s always jealousy or envy that happens in social groups, so a lot of college students are interested in the evil eye in the sense that this is a concept that they’re experiencing,” Magri said. 

Ali Fernand – Managing Editor

Monthly Magic is helping students defend themselves from the bad intentions of others this Halloween month.  

“The evil eye is a worldwide phenomenon and belief in this idea that someone can look at you, and just by looking at you, they can give you an evil gaze,” said Coordinator of Monthly Magic Kyle Magri. 

This is a belief held by many different types of religion and spirituality. The meeting explained its role in religions such as Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism and Paganism. 

“Every culture and religion has some experience with the evil liar, some belief, or at least a rejection of the notion of the evil eye,” Magri said.  

Monthly Magic meetings have an interfaith focus to their topics. Every month, Magri prepares a presentation on a topic of his choosing. This can either be about a belief held by multiple religions or a specific belief in a certain religion.  

Some Monthly Magic attendees are people who want an educational experience on spirituality and culture. Both believers and nonbelievers participate in the monthly meetings.  

“I have some Pagan friends who’ve talked about that, and I’m excited to learn what it actually is,” said earth science major Alexander Moser, a sophomore.  

There are some students who actively practice the beliefs of the evil eye. This includes different charms worn on jewelry meant to protect them from the evil eye.  

“It’s more of a comfort thing to just know that you’re being protected from people who are trying to harm you,” said environmental science major Abby Boyle, a junior.  

The evil eye is a darker topic that Monthly Magic has decided to present to students. Magri says he typically tries to pick out topics that are uplifting to students. However, a twist for Halloween felt appropriate.  

“Since it’s October, I wanted to do a topic that’s got a little bit of an edge to it and is a little scary, and the evil eye, this idea that someone can just on a look, give you bad luck or curse,” Magri said.  

Monthly Magic is affiliated with the SAGE Center, making a queer lens important to their meetings. The evil eye was the perfect way to blend both spooky topics and queer spirituality.  

“A lot of women and queer people are believed to have special power to give people the evil eye, send evil their way and to provide the means for people to protect from the evil eye,” Magri said.  

The queer history was an important aspect to this meeting. Queer students have an ability to feel more connected to the roots of spirituality after historically being left out of those conversations.  

“We’re here to create a safe space for queer people to engage with spirituality and religion. That’s always been our mission,” Magri said.  

All students can find something to learn from the evil eye, whether it’s new information on queerness, spirituality or culture.  

“There’s always jealousy or envy that happens in social groups, so a lot of college students are interested in the evil eye in the sense that this is a concept that they’re experiencing,” Magri said. 

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