Eilish joins James Bond Legacy with ‘No Time to Die’


Sofia RositaniReporter

“No Time to Die” is the new single by Billie Eilish for the James Bond film with the same title. This will be the final film that Daniel Craig will be playing James Bond.

Songs from past James Bond films were sung by Paul McCartney, Alicia Keys and Adele. The last two songs in the franchise Adele’s “Skyfall” and Sam Smith’s “Writing on the Wall” won the Oscar for Best Original Song. Eilish will go down in history for being the youngest to sing a James Bond song.

The song Eilish’s brother, Finneas Baird O’Connell wrote, is similar to her other songs, but with a 007 twist. The song has a trancing and captivating sound, with James Bond undertones.

Eilish’s in her songs gives off a creepy vibe, injected with light and airy tones. In portions of the song the original “James Bond theme song” that has been the signature song since 1962: “Dr. No” which was the first James Bond film, plays in the background.

“There is no more iconic pairing of music and cinema than the likes of Goldfinger and Live and Let Die,” said Eilish and her brother, Baird O’Connell, in an interview with British Broadcast Corporation.

“We feel so so lucky to play a small role in such a legendary franchise. Long live 007,” said Eilish.

Before the song was released Craig, had to approve the movie’s theme song, “No Time to Die.” “He had to like it. If Daniel doesn’t like it, you don’t get the job,” O’Connell said.

Tuesday, Feb. 18, Eilish performed “No Time to Die” with her brother on piano, Johnny Marr, guitarist for the Smith’s, and Hans Zimmer conducting the orchestra. After her Bond-filled performance, Eilish won her first Brit Award, for Best International Female with an emotional speech.

“I felt very hated recently and when I was on the stage and I saw you guys all smiling at me, it genuinely made me want to cry,” Eilish said teary eyed, “and I want to cry right now. So, thank you. You’re the only reason I exist.”

In the United Kingdom, Eilish’s song “No Time to Die” reached number one on the Billboard charts. The song broke the record for the biggest opening for any Bond theme. Eilish is the first woman to get a number one for a Bond song in the United Kingdom Best Sellers and Sam Smith’s “Writing on the Wall” was previously the No.1 Bond song. While this was happening Eilish also passed one billion streams in the United Kingdom.

“We were a pair/But I saw you there/Too much to bear You were my life, but life is far away from fair/I let it burn/You’re no longer my concern/ Faces from my past return/ Another lesson yet to learn.”

These lyrics are suggesting that someone from Bond’s past, his lover, Madeleine, played by Léa Seydoux, from the last film “Spectre,” betrays him in the upcoming film.

Bond never fell in love with his Bond girls, which is something we will see in the upcoming film, and the lyrics in the song feels like a love song or a heartbreak song, it really depends on how it is listened to.

As someone who is not a huge fan of Eilish or her music, but grew up with the adventures of James Bond, I think Eilish’s performance is very true to the Bond films. It is no “Skyfall” by Adele or “Live and Let Die” by Paul McCartney, which I thought better represented the film, but it still incorporates the Bond aspects in it. I did not think Eilish and her brother could pull off effortlessly, but they did and I personally enjoy the song and think it was beautifully written for the film.

Eilish is now a part of a legacy of performers who have written and performed songs for James Bond films starting in 1960. She is a part of an honorary list. If her name was not recognized before the world will know her after April 10, the opening of the next James Bond film.

Eilish broke the barrier as an 18-year-old performing a song for a world-renowned franchise like James Bond.

Photo Credit: Sofia Rositani

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